Chinese New Year Customs: Things You Shouldn’t Do During the New Year

Chinese New Year Customs: Things You Shouldn’t Do During the New Year

People who believe in Chinese customs take good care of their practices, especially during the Lunar Year. They are considered as omens of luck and adhering to those practices helps people avoid violating the taboos. Certain taboos of the Lunar New Year sustains only for the first few days after the festival begins while some other taboos are valid until the lantern festival, and some even for the whole month. 

It is a great deal for everyone to stick onto those practices as they believe that those practices would bring good luck to them throughout the entire year. Listed below are a few things to not do during the Lunar New Year. 

Avoid the Use of Taboo Words in Conversations

The first and foremost thing one needs to take care of, especially during the Lunar New Year season is to pay attention to words in a conversation with someone. Make sure that you avoid the use of negative words. You should also avoid talking about poverty, death, and problems like loss and killing. If needed, you can address such situations using mild and indirect words in conversations. 


Doing House Chores

Among the many Chinese New Year customs, cleaning up and doing the house chores is one of the main taboos as it symbolizes bad luck and hardships throughout the year. Chinese people also believe that sweeping and dusting homes would sweep away luck and fortune of the Lunar New Year. Another Chinese belief is that washing clothes on the first two days of the Chinese New Year is an offence to the Water God. 
Deep-clean your living space by yourself or by hiring professional cleaning services from Sendhelper well before the beginning of the new year. This practice helps you to celebrate the New Year to the fullest. You would mostly be busy attending festive activities and engaging in celebrations with guests at your homes during the Chinese New Year.


Avoid Using Sharp Utensils

Using sharp utensils cuts away the good luck of your life. Using scissors is also one of the taboos as it symbolises fight. Therefore, make sure that you keep such utensils away for a few days.  

Fill up the Rice Barrels

Rice jars at a person's home indicate the living standards of his/her family. Fill-up the rice jars to the brim before the New Year’s evening as empty jars are a symbol of starvation waiting for them in the new year. It is also regarded as a healthy belief to attract a healthy financial situation into the family. 

Dressing Rags 

Most people regard Chinese New Year as a new beginning, and they look at it with a lot of positivity. Therefore, people usually dress themselves up in new clothes they shopped from bazaars. Ragged and old dresses symbolise poverty as well as a misfortune - so dress yourself up in neat and new clothes. Wearing black and white outfits is also regarded as a taboo as they usually wear them for mourning ceremonies. 

Crying on Chinese New Year

Weeping on the starting of any day itself is not good - same is the case with the Lunar New Year. One of the things the elderly-people take care is not to make small children in the family cry - they believe that it will bring misfortune to the family during the year. Avoid punishing children on the Lunar Year when they make mistakes; sort their mistakes out with patience. 

Make sure to make yourself and others happy this Lunar New Year as being happy never goes out of fashion! 

Need to clean home? Hire Sendhelper Cleaning Services

A clean and organised home creates happy and positive vibes for you and your family. Declutter your home well before the New Year's eve. Book cleaning/deep cleaning services on the Sendhelper to enjoy the services of 5-star cleaning professionals in Singapore.

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